The Food Scene of a Gospel Culture

The Food Scene of a Gospel Culture

Every culture has their dish. Whether it’s a small tribal town in Northern Thailand (blood jelly hammered into pork) or up north in Chicago (deep-dish pizza), culture and food go hand-and-hand. Hand-to-mouth, I guess.

What is the dish of a gospel culture? What delicacy marks the disciples of Jesus of Nazareth? It’s not a casserole. No crockpots. But it is a carb and a cup.

The Lord’s Supper is the meal that marks our culture. The local church has an edible gospel. A piece of bread and a cup of red wine/juice reminds us of the crucifixion of our Lord.

Every crunch and sip recalls a flavor profile of promises and gifts. Jesus dying in our place for our sins—the forgiveness of sins, pardon for sinners, new life for sinners, immigration papers for the Kingdom of God, and an inheritance of glory when we join him. A family. A Father, big Brother, and a Helper. Nothing matches the umami of the Lord’s Supper.

The beauty of this meal is that political borders or languages don’t lock it up. You’ll find this dish in Japan, Kenya, Canada, Australia, and Colombia. Senior citizens and Millenials love it too. This meal even transcends periods of history. From the 1st century in Galatia to the 21st century in Germany, from castle churches in the Reformation to cafetoriums from a freshly planted church—”Do this in remembrance of me.”

This is your culture, our culture. You are home. Safe in Christ. Cheers!, or Salud!, or Cin Cin, or Prost!, or 干杯 / Gān bēi, or Santé!. Take and eat.

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